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refused to consider higher tax rates. timing is also a sticking point here. here is john boehner this weekend. >> 2013 should be the year to begin to solve our debt through tax reform and entitlement reform. together we should avert the fiscal cliff in a manner that ensures 2013 finally is that year. >> no accident, by the way, it was boehner who did the republican response to the president this weekend. the president holds the most leverage in the next two months, directly after the election and before tax rates expire. when the threat of a tax increase on the middle class hangs over the negotiations. republicans would like to try out the negotiations to see the political climate is better for them in the next congress. the big question is how much did the white house learn from the failed debt talk to 2011? will the president bypass leader ship and begin to try to deal directly with the republican senators who have sounded the most open to compromise. >> i think there is a deal. the ying and yang of this is we know there have to be revenues. look, i haven't met a wealthy republ
closing loopholes. that is a reputation of what john boehner suggested in the days since the president has been re-elected. >> that's totally right. a key point, the simpson-bowles tax idea is kind of a magic pony, right. everyone agrees in the ab instruct, we can bring down the rates, close loopholes and deductions and raise revenue. if that's such a wonderful idea how come it's only come up now. how come no one has done it. the reason is because it's really, really hard politically. once you get into the specifics. if you're trying to tie all the revenue to this abstract tax reform idea you're going to get into a position where the revenue is about never going to happen because once you get into reality it doesn't materialize. >> you have to do both, john. you have to do -- you have to raise the the rates and close loopholes to get the amount -- >> just raise the rates. >> you can't raise the rates high enough to produce $1.6 trillion. >> you can get $900 billion from expiring the bush tax cuts. >> and where do you get the other $700 billion from from. >> do a little reform and cut the r
boehner, who have already openly said, no increases in tax rates? >> well, you have to splinter off some republicans, in the senate it will be easier because you just have to get to 60. you might pass the december 31st deadline where you have a few more democrats in the senate. but the problem is always going to be the house. i think there may be a bargain in the -- in the side of coming to republicans and saying, here are cuts. but the price of those cuts will be that 2%. republicans will face a very tough choice in just a very short time. are they the ones that are going to be responsible for giving 98% of americans tax hikes? do the republicans want to be known as the party that raised your taxes for everybody but 2%? >> right. and i think, martin -- >> so, the 2% solution may be a noose around the republicans' neck. >> i think the republicans have little leverage. not just for that reason but a couple of other reasons. if you consider the fact that taxes are at 15% of gdp, spending is at 24%, even the paul ryan budget proposes we only reduce spending to 20% of gdp. that means five pe
was that john boehner was re-elected as speaker by this republican conference, and they knew that boehner was going to be a dealmaker with the president. so even the hard liners may have read the election returns, and i think even the hard liners don't be responsible for a tax increase. >> not only boehner, even mcconnell. let me show you this, michelle. mcconnell and boehner had a different kind of sound, different tone today after the meeting. watch this. >> obviously the president won re-election. the republicans were basically unable to get any seats in the senate. more people voted for democrats in the house than republicans. why do you have any leverage whatsoever? >> there's a republican majority here in the house. the american people re-elected the republican majority. >> it's important to remember that in this case, the voters also re-elected a republican-controlled house last week. the fact is the government is organized no differently today than it was after the republican wave of 2010. >> now, listen to what they had to say today. >> tomorrow is speaker boehner's birthday. so
the president sat between house speaker john boehner and senate majority leader harry reid calling for cooperation and compromise. >> we've got to make sure that taxes don't go up on middle-class families, that our economy remains strong, that we're creating jobs, and that's an agenda that democrats and republicans and independents, people all across the country, share. so, our challenge is to make sure that, you know, we are able to cooperate together, work together. >> joining me now for more, congressional reporter for "the washington post" ed o'keefe and national journal correspondent nancy cook. good morning both of you. last time we saw those three together, sort of a kumbayah moment when you have reid and boehner and mcconnell together. did you get a sense, ed, putting revenue on the table meant republicans were open to tax hikes for those makes $250,000 or more? >> no, they're not. they still say they don't want to see that increase. by talking about revenues the idea is you close loopholes, find a way to perhaps limit deductions and create revenue that way. but you know, b
of the united states. house speaker john boehner has less support each day for a hard line approach. republican opposition to tax increases is slipping in congress. anti-tax lobbyist grover norquist no longer as a majority of supporters in either chamber. "the hill" says newly elected republicans refuse to sign the anti-tax pledge during the campaigns and another handful of returning republicans have disavowed their alliance to the written commitment. it's about time. at least they paid attention to the election. today bobby jindal scolded the entire party for the approach to the economy. hold it right there. this comment, he sewer sounds like a democrat. we've got to make sure that weren't the party of big business, big banks, big wall street bailouts, big corporate loophole, big anything. we cannot be, we must not be the party that simply protects the rich so they get to keep their toys. bobby, come on over to the good side, dude. you're talking like a conservative democrat. momentum is on the president's side. he just needs to know how motivated his allies are. the hard work didn't end last
consens consensus. john boehner got the message. >> to show our seriousness, we have put revenue on the table as long as it's accompanied by significant spending cuts. >> senate majority leader harry reid and democratic leader nancy pelosi sounded equally positive. >> we have the cornerstones of being able to work something out. we'll both have to give up some of the things that we know are a problem. >> we understand that it has to be about cuts, it has to be about revenue, it has to be about growth. >> then came senate minority leader mitch mcconnell. so we might have a fly in the ointment. here it is. >> i can say on the part of my members that we fully understand that you can't save the country until you have entitlement programs that fit the demographics of the changing america in the coming years. we're prepared to put revenue on the table, provided we fix the real problem. >> the real problem? let me tell you something, senator. the real problem is two unfunded wars from the bush years, the bush tax cuts, and the give away to big pharma. senator mcconnell, it seems to me l
to december 29th and dictator obama forced this on us. is that the game mcconnell and boehner play here? >> i think they know that game won't play well. they have to play it. everyone has to take a sacrifice here, and when you do the numbers with america's finances to keep the entitlements entact, if slightly different from today, to keep social security intact and get the economy back and growing, everyone has to take a little bit of a hit, whether it's the private equity guy with his carried interest exclusion and the $750,000 home morn tax deduction, which is completely absurd. that doesn't help the middle class. they all have to happen. if everyone is -- you saw bob corker last week or over the weekend. there are a lot of sensible people out there. i think sensible minds will prevail. this is just a fiscal cliff. it pushes it off to july 4th to be patriotic with an agreement and framework to work towards a big deal. it is only this artificial construct we're talking about now. what we need to get for everybody to be happy and the markets to be happy and the chinese and the japanese and th
driveway. the congressional leaders, boehner, reid, pelosi, mcconnell, were optimistic but cautious about a deal. here they are at the stakeout. >> to show our seriousness, we have put revenue on the table as long as it's accompanied by significant spending cuts. >> we have the cornerstones of being able to work something out. we're both going to have to give up some of the things that we know are a problem. >> we should have a goal in terms of how much deficit reduction. we should have a deadline before christmas. we should show some milestones of success so that confidence can build. >> we're prepared to put revenue on the table provided we fix the real problem. >> the real problem. you got that? mcconnell is always the tree stump on the lawn when you're trying to cut it. this afternoon the president held his fourth and final meetings with stakeholders, civic leaders, and members of civic organizations. marc morial is president of the urban league, he was at the afternoon meeting as was aaron smith is cofoirnd of a group called young invincibles dedicated to ensuring that young people's
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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